Surfing in Colombia

Surfing is not really big in Colombia. So it can be quite hard to find a taxi that is willing to take you and your board(s) along. Busses are usually no problem, though, they store everything underneath and never charged us extra.

Guachalito

The Pacific has some world-class waves that are not (yet) known at all. It is not easy to get there (it involves a plane and various boats), but if you have time, it’s totally worth it. Not only for the surf experience, but also for the untouched beauty of this area. We flew to Nuqui and took a boat to Guachalito. There’s a sweet and obviously empty beach break close to “town” (a handful of houses and hotels). If you feel adventurous, find a few fellow surfers and charter a boat to Pico de Loro. It’s a world-class left-hand pointbreak that can get huge. You will most likely have it to yourselves, as it’s honestly in the middle of nowhere. Supposedly, there’s sharks, but there have never been any incidents. There’s one guy who rents surfboards, but certainly no equipment to buy anywhere nearby.

There’s obviously more surfspots on the Pacific, but unfortunately we didn’t get to discover them. We ran out of money and as there are absolutely no ATMs around, we had to head back to Medellín. Read this (German only, sorry) if you want more info on what to consider before heading off to the Pacific coast.

Palomino

This one shouldn’t be your top priority if all you want to do is surf. But the place is awesome and you will most likely end up staying longer than planned. There are waves (not always) at the main beach in front of all the hostels. It’s a beach break with pretty fast lefts and rights that break on a rather shallow sand bottom. It’s easy to break your board here. You can also take a bus along the coast towards Tayrona National Park and surf at one of many other spots in the area. There’s two spots in the park itself as well. If you have some swell, any of these spots can be pretty good! Just ask around for directions.